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The new version of Alex Haley’s American family origin story based around the life of Kunta Kinte is described as an original, contemporary production, incorporating more material from Haley’s novel, ROOTS: The Saga of an American Family, as well as carefully researched new scholarship of the time.

‘Roots’ Remake Set As Event Series On History, A&E & Lifetime; Will Packer & Original Star LeVar Burton To Produce | Deadline

If you’ve never seen the original “Roots” I HIGHLY recommend it. It’s a staggering achievement and it still retains its power – even with the 70s TV conventions of the time, the addition of extra storylines full of extraneous white people (I like Marc “Beastmaster” Singer as much as the next guy, but that entire storyline is a waste of space), and the gratuitous OJ Simpson cameo.  

Here’s hoping the new version doubles down on the good stuff and resists the urge to add the irrelevant. 

https://twitter.com/jaybushman/status/183781335909933056

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dondrapered:

Campbell-isms through the years.

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Mae Whitman is a remarkable young actor. Watching her on “Parenthood” for the full run of that show, she is so in touch with her emotional core that when she has to pull up the big stuff for her big scenes, it feels genuinely dangerous. She taps into something deep and real. And then on top of that, she’s funny. Very funny, actually. Her work on “Arrested Development” or in “The Duff” is confirmation of her lethal chops, and also her own ability to steer into the way Hollywood casts her, subverting it at the same time. “The Duff” felt like a break-through for her, a film that put her in the right light and made the case for her as an enormously appealing lead.

“Independence Day 2” would be lucky to have someone as talented as Mae Whitman in it, and this decision seems like such a blatant, tin-eared attempt to follow industry heat and pander to industry norms about who can or can’t be a lead in this kind of film that I’m feeling fed up before this thing even begins.

The case of the missing Mae Whitman and Independence Day 2

I’d cast Mae Whitman in everything if I could. 

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themarysue:

hexzell:

Bonus:

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Princess Leia says, Fuck you. 

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okbjgm:

worst. prequel. ever.

laissezferre:

faewithoutconsequence:

cloaga:

i love that charles dickens got paid by the word. like i cant even be mad when he’s boring and long-winded bc i would do xactly the same??? i wouldnt use contractions or colours at all. want to say the word red? too bad. we r now only using “the colour of freshly-spilled blood on snow; the hue of the horizon when the sun sets over the deserts of sub-saharan Africa” BOOM guess who can afford 2 eat now: me and my boi dickens 

What I love about Alexandre Dumas, in contrast, is he got paid by the line. So it’s not really wordy, it more like 80% dialogue which makes it sound pretty modern but also ends up like-

“Where are we going now?”

“We are going to the city.”

“Which city?”

“Paris.”

“We are going to Paris?”

“Yes.”

# can you imagine the kind of extended torture we would have been subject to if victor hugo had been paid by the pun (via vlajean)

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soulmeetsworld:

Louis C.K.

wolvensnothere:

the-super-scout:

helioscentrifuge:

runtime-err0r:

itsvondell:

you can take one man’s trash to another man’s treasure but you can’t make it drink

Fun fact: the blending of idioms or cliches is called a malaphor.

My personal favorite is “We’ll burn that bridge when we get to it.”

I looked it up b/c that was a very familiar idiom and how could it be wrong but then

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yeah wow that’s spot on perfect

my catchphrase

Only if you assume that burning bridges is a mistake: image

“We’ll burn that bridge when we get to it.” are my House words.

iamthepureblindraven:

theumbrellaseller:

one thing I find hilarious is when Shakespeare quotes are used out of context

like, people are always saying “some are born great, some achieve greatness, and some have greatness thrust upon them” as if it’s all deep and meaningful when actually it comes from a prank letter in Twelfth Night

and “This above all: to thine own self be true” comes from Polonius in Hamlet wherein the joke is that he’s an old pompous dude giving a long and rambling speech full of contradictory pointless advice to his son

“Brevity is the soul of wit” is another joke, because again, it’s made by Polonius who will just not shut up

it’s “we are such stuff as dreams are made on not of “, as in, “such stuff as dreams are built on

“wherefore art thou, Romeo” doesn’t mean “where are you, Romeo” it means “why the fuck are you called Romeo, shit, I wanted to bang you but I can’t because you’re a goddamn Montague”

all these lines have acquired a kind of dignity in text that they never had in performance or are constantly misinterpreted

It’s not necessarily bad but it is kind of funny, sometimes.

#GREATNESS THRUST UPON THEM WAS A SEX JOKE#THE GREATNESS#WAS HIS PENIS#HIS FUCKING PENIS#STOP USING IT SERIOUSLY IT WAS A DICK JOKE#IM B E G G I N G YOU (x)